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Cover Fedorov L.A. SOVIET CHEMICAL ARMAMENT: History. Politics
Id: 172809
 
29.9 EUR

SOVIET CHEMICAL ARMAMENT: History. Politics. Part 1

URSS. 400 pp. (English). Paperback. ISBN 978-5-396-00518-1.

 Summary

This book synthesizes for the first time ever the information from various Soviet archives (military, governmental, economic, public, etc.) about the creation and development of chemical weapons in the Soviet Union, and provides data about the wide-ranging and secret preparation of USSR for an offensive chemical warfare against a potential enemy.

Additionally, the book offers a general analysis about the influence of chemical warfare on the environment.

The book is intended for scientists, military experts, chemical and medical specialists, environmental activists and a wide range of readers with an interest in chemical warfare and chemical safety.


 Table of contents

Preface
Chapter 1. Chemistry as a weapon of the revolutionary army
 1.1.World War I
 1.2.The chemical legacy of the Russian Empire
 1.3.After the Bolshevik coup d’etat
 1.4.Poison for the enemies of Soviet power
 1.5.The making of a chemical warfare organization
 1.6.Military chemistry and the Soviet economy
Chapter 2. Chemical enemies and friends abroad
 2.1.Soviet intelligence at work
 2.2.The great German chemistry
 2.3.Combat collaboration with Hitler’s predecessors
 2.4.The attempt at a military friendship with Mussolini
 2.5.Other countries
Chapter 3 The creation of a chemical warfare industry
 3.1.The formation of a nitrogen and chlorine industry
 3.2.Sulfuric independence
 3.3.The battle for arsenic
 3.4.The overall infrastructure of chemical warfare
 3.5.The Soviet poison industry before the war
Chapter 4 Pre-war soviet chemical weapons
 4.1.Poison -- it’s so tempting
 4.2.Chemical warfare systems
 4.3.Chemical artillery weapons
 4.4.A chemical portrait of land-forces
 4.5.The chemical troops
 4.6.Chemical weapons for aviation
Chapter 5 The Great Patriotic War
 5.1.Ready for battle with imperialists
 5.2.Winter war and other events of 1938--1940
 5.3.The Great Patriotic War
 5.4.Chemical warfare achievements
 5.5.The everyday life of the chemical attack industry
 5.6.The chemical trophies of the Great War
Chapter 6 Military chemistry after the Great War
 6.1.Cold war with a chemical inclination
 6.2.From sarin to soman
 6.3.Towards total chemical warfare
 6.4.Chemical warfare agents and the 20th century
 6.5.How much poison was prepared
 6.6.Soviet chemical munitions
Chapter 7 The soviet chemical warfare complex
 7.1.A chemical portrait of the Red/Soviet Army
 7.2.The chemical warfare industry
 7.3.Secret medicine
 7.4.The triumph of the chemical warfare complex
List of abbreviations
References

 


 Preface

The world will feel more at ease without the Soviet chemical weapons, especially the citizens of Russia.

and its establishment gave the public turned out most often to be a half-truth or a lie. The information of the intelligence services of the West was no more reliable. The country's authorities actively rejected alternative points of view.

th century came to light -- the “Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or Other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare” adopted in 1925 in Geneva and the “Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of the Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction” signed in Paris in 1993 -- the secrets of the past chemical armament have lost any meaning. And something entirely different came to the fore -- the social and ecological aspect of a Soviet offensive chemical warfare which never occurred.

about the creation of an integrated system of chemical attack; about the formation and development of the chemical warfare infrastructure (chemical warfare services, chemical troops, laboratories, institutes and proving grounds ). Second, there are many documents about the creation and testing of different kinds of chemical warfare agents and chemical weapons in general (ground forces, artillery, and aviation ), the overall requirements for them and other summarizing materials ; about training for a chemical offensive and waging offensive chemical warfare ; about the creation and operation of an industry geared for chemical attack ; about the stockpiling and handling of tons of chemical weapons Finally, there are many documents about the public health and environmental aspects of the problem of putting into circulation a wide variety of chemical warfare agents, about Soviet the details of chemical warfare collaboration with various countries and also about the intelligence and counter-intelligence activity of Soviet authorities during preparations for chemical warfare.


 About author

L.A. Fedorov is a professional chemist with a doctorate in chemical sciences. After graduating from the Moscow State University in 1965, he worked at the Academy of Sciences of the USSR/Russia until his retirement. In 1992, after co-authoring an article entitled "The Poisoned Policy" in Moscow News, he be-came one of the accused in a sensational case against "betrayers of state secrets" concerning chemical weapons. The case happily came to nothing. In 1993, he founded and headed the Union for Chemical Safety that speaks out in defense of people and nature against chemical aggression perpetrated by the state. The Union is involved in studying and dealing with environmental consequences of the development and production of stockpiles of chemical, missile and biological weapons. The Union is also involved in dealing with the damage to humans and the environment from the excessive use of such dangerous "chemicals" as pesticides, dioxins, heavy metals and other manmade contaminants. L.A. Fedorov is the author of the first Russian monographs on such important environmental issues as dioxins (1993), chemical weapons (1995) and others.


 About the author

Lev Aleksandrovich Fedorov

Professional chemist with a doctorate in chemical sciences. After graduating from Moscow State University in 1965, he worked at the Academy of Sciences of the USSR/Russia until his retirement.

In 1992, after co­­-authoring an article entitled «The Poisoned Policy» in Moscow News, he became one of the accused in a sensational case against «betrayers of state secrets» concerning chemical weapons. The case happily came to nothing.

In 1993, he founded and headed the Union for Chemical Safety that speaks out in defense of people and nature against chemical aggression perpetrated by the state. The Union is involved in studying and dealing with environmental consequences of the development and production of stockpiles of chemical, missile and biological weapons. The Union also deals with the damage to humans and the environment from the excessive use of such dangerous «chemicals» as pesticides, dioxins, heavy metals and other man-made contaminants.

L. A. Fedorov is the author of the first Russian monographs on such important environmental issues as dioxins (1993), chemical weapons (1995) and others.


 
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